Easter Scavenger Hunt

This Easter I wanted something different, something  that we had never done before. We’d done Easter crafts, Easter cooking, Easter egg hunt… but I was really glad to accidentally come across some Easter scavenger hunt on the net. I thought I could tailor it to the girls. So I did.

As they are still young and found Jesus’ crucifixion and resurrection too frightening (we read some simple books about it), I stayed with the bunny theme this year.

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Some presents (very few sweets and no chocolate treats at all) were hidden by the Easter bunny around the flat and the rabbit also made sure that the girls have some challenge. He left rhyming notes everywhere to give directions to the girls where they could find the next gift location.

Early in the morning we heard some bunny sounds (thanks Daddy and youtube). The kids jumped out of bed and started searching for the goodies.

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E. read out the little poems and helped her little sister to find the places of presents.

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They both enjoyed it a lot and were excited about the findings and the whole game. It was more fun that I’d thought.

 

You can download our Easter Scavenger Hunt Rhymes here. (It’s editable so you can alter it as you wish)

Thanks, Easter Bunny!

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Easter egg suncatcher

There hasn’t been much sunlight to catch this Easter but I’m hopeful that soon we can enjoy a little bit of sunshine after this long, gloomy and really cold winter.

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The green is Little L’s and the orange is E.’s egg suncatcher

What you need:

  • contact paper (here in Hungary the best is the self-adhesive cover for school books)
  • colour paper of your choice
  • small items like paper strips, flower petals, paper cut-outs etc (I used tiny bunnies, flowers, hearts etc. having bought from Flying Tiger Shop)

Preparation:

  • cut out an egg-shaped frame and make frames out of your coloured paper
  • cut out a piece of contact paper and peel off its cover
  • place it in front of you sticky side up and put the egg-shaped frame on it. Cut it along the frame
  • place the tiny decorative elements on a tray or in little cups in front of your child together with the sticky egg

Your child will make patterns and decoration on the sticky egg.

When the artwork is finished you place another layer of contact paper on it (sticky side down) to seal it off.

Fix it in the window and wait for the sun to shine. Enjoy the beautiful colours and shapes.

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We did this activity with E.&L.’s Godparents and their kids. They all loved it and made fantastically decorative eggs.

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This activity can be done not only with egg shapes but flower shaped frame too. Even if you are not very talented at drawing the easiest way to make a flower frame is to draw it. Have fun and enjoy the sunshine.

Happy Easter!

 

Easter 2016 summary

It seems Easter time is the busiest in our life as I’m always late with the summary of our celebrations. This is the same this year too. It’s June already and I’ve just finished writing about our Easter 2016.

A few days before Easter we decorated our egg tree (catkins twigs). E. was very excited when we opened the Eater decoration boxes. She, almost all by herself, did the whole decoration. (Baby Sis was helping her out with some cooing)

She also found some earlier egg matching activity I had written about in an earlier post. Of course, she needed to do it quickly.

At this time we had been painting eggs for weeks. Most of them were blown-out eggshells therefore rather fragile. (I broke some of them after Easter time).

We also prepared some Styrofoam eggs as well. First, we painted them red, then, as E. was quite fascinated by the pins in my sewing kit box, I let her decorate her red egg with multicoloured pins.

As always E. (and this time Baby Sis, too) was sprinkled by some family members (Daddy and Grandpa) as well as Godfather in the morning. She was well prepared in her rabbit costume.

Sprinkling from Daddy

Kisses to Grandpa

Later on we went to the playground. Daddy ran ahead and hid some presents in the grass while we were slowly walking towards the area. By the time we arrived we saw Daddy quarreling with an 8-10 year boy and his mum as the boy had taken away and almost opened one of the eggs. Nice beginning… Luckily everything was calm and quiet when we arrived and E. could look for her presents.

collecting

a bit of reading

finishing the egg hunt with swinging

This year these were the presents:

  • a Green eggs and ham By Dr. Seuss
  • a Shopkins egg
  • a Smarties egg
  • a Hello Kitty dining room set
  • a tiny stapler
  • hair bobbles hidden in a plastic egg (not in the picture)
  • gummies hidden in a plastic egg (not in the picture)

All in all, our Easter was great with lots of Hungarian and a little English, but we all enjoyed ourselves.

Easter patterns

We’ve already covered the basic patterns when we were talking about clothes, but decorating Easter eggs has brought the topic up again.

Checked, flowery, stripy, plain, spotty were the words to revise. Much to my surprise E. remembered them.

We did a little painting but E. was not willing to paint patterns, so I followed her lead. It was long time ago when I gave up sticking to a project.

At another occasion I drew Easter eggs on the whiteboard and also the name of their patterns mixed up. She enjoyed matching the words and the patterns. She also mentioned that we can call something spotty polka-dotted as well.

That’s all about patterns at Easter. I’ll come back with another post on our Easter this year.

Easter egg crafts

There’s no Easter without eggs. Egg painting, egg making, blowing out eggs, eating eggs, sticking egg, decorating with eggs and so on.

Here are a few things we’ve been doing with eggs lately.

Decor tape eggs

Just draw an egg and supply your little one with some decor tape or washi tape. Be prepared: tape will be everywhere. In hair, on clothes and some on your drawn egg, too. If you want to save a pretty decor tape, do NOT give it into the hands of a 3 year old (or below).

A lot of cutting is involved, which is great practice for little hands.

If you put it around the house all your guests can admire the final product

Dot marker eggs

The original plan was to follow some patterns (ABAB or ABBABB), but it didn’t work that way. I plan something and E. thinks differently. So we went with the flow. Some hand painting, making fingerprints, drawing lines, colouring freely etc.

You can print or draw and egg shape and provide your child with dot-markers

Pom-pom painting 

This is a variation of the dot marker painting. If you don’t have dot markers use pom-pom and clothes pegs.

First, E. started to use the colours one by one (although she was drawing with the pom-poms like with a paintbrush; she refused to make dots like with the dot marker)

Then colour mixing kicked it
I was crazy enough to let her sprinkle a little glitter over the wet, painted eggs (well, never again, it’s more than MESSY). I must admit she helped me happily with the cleaning up.

After they have dried I cut them out, added a ribbon and stuck the on the door frame in our living-room.

Of course, we had some traditional egg painting (with blown out eggs and acrylic paint, which E. calls “the big girl paint”). On Sunday during church time, children could paint eggs. There and then we tried wax crayon drawing and painting on eggs for the first time which is beautiful. I have a plan for next year’s egg painting.

According to the Hungarian tradition, we also decorated a bunch of goat/pussy willow (which we simply call catkins) with eggs and other ornaments.

I hope you’ve had an EGG-cellent Easter!